An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Home : Articles
Have a Soldier/Warfighter who takes pride and ownership of their assigned equipment? Then nominate them for PS Magazine's "I Own This" recognition program. Click HERE to learn more.
 
PS Magazine poster image which links to the posters page at https://www.psmagazine.army.mil/Resources/Posters/
Click on image above to view and
download 
this and other posters
Would you stake your life, right now, on the condition of your equipment?
Articles
NEWS | Dec. 19, 2022

M1-Series Tank: Road Testing Part of PMCS

BLUF: PMCS isn’t done until you take your M1-series tank for a road test.
   
Crewmen, there’s more to doing PMCS on your M1-series tank than checking fluid levels, and making sure batteries are charged and track is properly tensioned.
 
Sure, all those things (and more) are very important. But one thing is often overlooked as part of preventive maintenance. And that’s taking your tank out for a road test.
 
Starting up your tank and getting it out on the road often will allow you to discover potential problems that aren’t evident while the tank is just sitting in the motor pool. Not to mention road testing helps keep the batteries charged up. Way too many tanks are sitting around motor pools with dead batteries, and that’s a major hit on unit readiness.
 
So, fire up your tank’s engine and hit the road (or trail). However, make sure to follow all relevant SOPs when it comes to moving tracked vehicles on or off the installation, and follow all applicable laws and safety regulations.
 
Note to unit leaders: make sure you support the need for frequent road testing by establishing the necessary programs, priorities and procedures to make them possible and safe.
 
Crewmen, once out on the road, keep your senses sharp. Look out for oil or other fluid leaks or excessive smoke coming from the exhaust. Keep an eye out for any caution or warning lights. Listen for unusual sounds and vibrations. Your nose can come in handy for detecting distinctive smells such as burning oil or overheating hubs.  If anything seems amiss, don’t hesitate to let your mechanic know.
Want to get better search results faster? 
Click the link below to access our "how to" guide
.
After entering a keyword, you must hit or click the Search bar/box below for the function to work.
Simply hitting Return won't yield results.
LOGSA Links/URLs
Note about links to archive articles

If you come across a link to a pre-2014 PS Magazine issue or article that uses LOGSA in the web address (URL), use this link instead:
 
For issues/articles from 2014 and after, click on the Archive/Index tab in the top menu of this website.

BE ADVISED: With the migration to Army365, emails in older articles may still reflect an @mail.mil address. To update, change the domain to @army.mil