NEWS | Nov. 4, 2020

CH-47D/F: Where to Store Tie-Down Chains

Mechanics, storing Chinook tie-down chains or anything else in the canted beams area by the ramp only results in damage to your aircraft.

The best maintenance practice is to never store tie-down chains in this area of the Chinook. Instead, put all chains in a box or bag and store them with your tool box on the cabin floor.
 
Don’t store tie-down chains on either side of ramp   Don’t store tie-down chains on either side of ramp
Don’t store tie-down chains on either side of ramp
 
The canted beams area by the ramp is made up of machined structure. Placing chains in the openings damages the canted beam and the surrounding area, which are difficult to repair.

The machined structure of the CH-47F model is stronger in that area than in previous designs, but only for flight loads. If damage occurs, it’s much harder to repair. The F-model isn’t designed to withstand the abuse that occurs from storing chains there, and over time that leads to cracks and chips, deforming the machined frame. The only authorized repair is replacing the entire machined structure because it can’t be patched.

Make a mental note that chains don’t belong in the canted beam area and that the area is only strong enough to handle in-flight loads! In flight, the chains rattle and put wear on the metal causing deformity and eventually cracks. And the repetitive nature of storing and retrieving the chains can lengthen and crack the storage sites. 
 
On the D-model Chinook, this canted beam area was made of sheet metal, which is fairly easy to repair and replace, but you still should not put chains in this area. They belong in a box or bag and should be stored alongside your tool kit in the cabin area. 
 
Example of damage in canted beam area on a D-model   Example of damage in canted beam area on a D-model
Example of damage in canted beam area on a D-model
 
Yes, old habits are hard to overcome, but follow this tip to protect your aircraft. 

You can use this infographic as an aide to training:

Tie-down chains proper storage infographic
Click on image above to open PDF version